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Category: Crazy Requests

Some customers can be demanding, but within reason. These customers however make some requests that go beyond demanding, beyond reasonable, beyond possible! These requests, like the customers, are crazy!

Here’s A Tip: Don’t Die

| WV, USA | Crazy Requests

(Due to the weather, my boss has decided that we will be closing early instead of running night shift. Tipped wage is about $2.15/hour where I live.)

Customer: “I bet you’re just closing early because you haven’t made any money today.”

(I’m a tipped worker, and I hadn’t made anything that day, but I actually don’t have the power to close the store for such a frivolous reason.)

Me: “Actually, our manager is concerned about the safety of workers coming in and out in this weather. She’s weird like that.”

Customer: *visibly irritated* “Well, I guess that’s fair.”

Me: “Yeah, I sort of appreciate not being expected to die for tipped wage.”

Don’t Run Away With Scissors

| OR, USA | Bizarre, Crazy Requests

(I am a receptionist in a retail office. We sell a variety of scissors, but have to order most of them. A regular — rather annoying — customer has us order one pair of each type of scissors for her, so she can touch them and decide which pair she wants. They all arrive and she is looking at them.)

Customer: “Well, this is the pair that I wanted! They’re perfect!” *holds up a single pair of scissors, out of several different kinds*

Me: “Awesome!” *beginning to clear away the other products, implying she did not want them*

Customer: *starts smacking the tops of my hands repeatedly* “No! No! No! No! No!”

Me: *I immediately drop the scissors and stare at her in shock* “Um…”

Customer: “OBVIOUSLY, I wanted to look at the rest of them!” *proceeds to examine all the other scissors, then only buy the original pair she liked*

Ice Cold Demands

| USA | Crazy Requests, Food & Drink

(My sandwich shop is located in a fairly affluent area of my city, between a well-known coffee shop and a smoothie shop, with whom we are on good terms. On this day, the ice machine has broken. A repairman is scheduled to fix it later in the day, but in the meantime my boss has instructed me to tell all customers about the lack of ice before selling them a drink. So far, none of them have had a problem. I’m serving a woman in her 40s during the middle of an extremely busy lunch rush.)

Me: “Would you like anything else with your sandwich today, ma’am?”

Customer: “Just a large soda, please.”

Me: “Sure thing! Just to let you know, our ice machine is currently not working, but the drinks are still cold. Will that be all right?”

Customer: *looking scandalized* “Excuse me? How am I supposed to get ice, then?”

Me: “Oh, well, some people have gone next door to [Coffee Shop] to get ice. They won’t mind giving you some.”

Customer: “Oh, all right, then.”

Me: “Great! Your total is [price].”

(She pays and then stares at me for several seconds. I smile uncertainly at her.)

Customer: “Well? Where is my ice?”

Me: “Um, you can just take it next door to [Coffee Shop] and—”

Customer: *looking as insulted as can be* “What?! You want me to go all the way over there and get it myself? Are you SERIOUS?” *looks to other customers for validation* “I mean, you call this customer service? YOU run out of ice and expect ME to pay the same price for a drink AND go find my own ice? I mean, honestly!”

(Startled, I look to my manager, who is as shocked by this outburst as I am. He looks at the 15 people still in line, then shrugs and nods, moving forward to take over my register. I grab the woman’s cup and run next door to the coffee shop. The barista fills the cup to the top with ice, and I run it back to the customer, who snatches it out of my hand.)

Customer: “THANK you. Was that so hard?”

(She marched to the soda fountain, dumped out all but two or three ice cubes, and filled her drink to the top.)