Category: At The Checkout

The customer has seemed normal and maybe even intelligent throughout the shopping purchase. But then they get to the checkout and as soon as human interaction is required it all falls apart. The checkout operators really are our first line of defense against the stupid customer!


When Sugary Doesn’t Mean Sweet, Part 2

| Philadelphia, PA, USA | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior

Customer: “I’ll take a vanilla ice cream on a waffle cone, please.”

Me: *walks over and grabs a waffle cone*

Customer: “No, not that cone. A WAFFLE Cone.”

Me: *goes and grabs a wafer cone*

Customer: “No, a WAFFLE CONE.”

Me: *grabs a sugar cone*

Customer: “Yes, that one.”

Me: “A sugar cone.”

(A few minutes later, the same customer comes up…)

Customer: “Watermelon on a waffle cone.”

Me: *goes straight for the sugar cone*

Customer: “Yes, finally you got it right.”

When Sugary Doesn’t Mean Sweet


America’s Debt Crisis Explained, Part 3

| Waleska, GA, USA | At The Checkout, Extra Stupid, Money, Technology

(I work in a store that sells some food items and accepts EBT food stamp cards. A woman comes in with a cart load of groceries and I ring up her items, including one box of baking soda. We sell both the kind you cook with, and the kind strictly for deodorizing/cleaning, and it states clearly on the box it isn’t for cooking (and is located in the cleaning section of the store.)

Me: “Your total is [amount].”

Customer: “I’m using EBT.”

(She slides the card and pays for the transaction. The system automatically charges just the food, leaving the small amount for the box of baking soda.)

Me: “That’ll be [amount], please.”

Customer: “What?”

Me: “For the baking soda; it’s [amount].”

Customer: “No, it’s food. I want it on my EBT card.”

Me: “I’m sorry, ma’am, you picked up the kind for cleaning. It’s not meant for cooking with. See—” *I show her the label* “—I’d be glad to go and get you the correct one, but unfortunately once the payment process has begun, the only way to complete it is to pay the remaining balance, or cancel the order.”

Customer: “I don’t want it then. Forget it. I just want to go. I paid for my food.”

Me: “I’m sorry, ma’am, but I either need the [amount] owed, or I need to cancel the order and ring it in again. It won’t take but a minute.”

Customer: “Fine.”

(I proceed to cancel the transaction. In order to put her money back on the EBT card she needs to put in her pin again.)

Me: “Okay, just put in your pin to cancel, please.”

Customer: “Why? I don’t want to be charged again; just cancel it.”

Me: “Ma’am, I’m sorry but to cancel it the money needs to go back on your EBT card. You need to put in your pin number to authorize that.”

Customer: “I don’t understand! I already put in my pin! I don’t want to be charged twice; just cancel it!”

Me: “I can’t cancel it until you put in your pin. I’m sorry. It won’t charge you twice, but your pin is giving us the authority to put your money back on your card.”

(Finally her daughter, exasperated, puts in the pin for her. I then ring up her items again, this time leaving out the baking soda.)

Me: “Okay, the total is now [amount], please.”

Customer: “What? I already paid. I’m not paying again!”

Me: “Ma’am, you paid once, but then didn’t want the baking soda, so I canceled the transaction and credited the money back into your account for your entire purchase. That’s why I had to ring it all in again.”

Customer: “I already paid! I’m not paying again!”

Me: “Ma’am. I rang up your items, then you slid your card and paid for the food items, but not the baking soda. The only way to fix this was to cancel the entire transaction and credit the money for the entire purchase — all the food — back onto your account. Like doing a refund. You did pay, but I gave the money back, not just for the baking soda, but for the entire thing. So you haven’t yet paid for these groceries.”

(The customer seems to understand and slides her card. When it asks for her pin she flips out again.)

Customer: “I already put my pin in twice! Why do I have to do this again! How many times am I being charged!?”

Me: “The first time you put in your pin was to pay the amount for the groceries. The second time was to authorize us to refund that money back into your account. This third time is to buy the groceries again. You’re only paying once, since we refunded the first purchase.”

(The customer got upset, refusing to “be charged a third time.” Finally her daughter, again frustrated and wanting to leave , put in the pin. The woman continued to question why she had to put her pin in as her daughter tried to shove her out the door. She came back twice to ask again why she had to put her pin in so many times. Finally her daughter succeeded in leading her out, casting me an apologetic look as they left.)

America’s Debt Crisis, Explained, Part 2
America’s Debt Crisis, Explained


Gone Acrobatty

| USA | At The Checkout, Bizarre, Health & Body

(I’m helping a woman and her toddler, and the computer is taking an unusually long time processing her order.)

Me: “Sorry, it’ll just be a while.”

Woman: “No problem.” *to toddler* “I’ll just put you down, okay?”

(As she bends over, I see an impatient-looking couple behind her. As she fusses with her child, the couple does an acrobatic trick that makes it look like they’re making out on TOP on the woman, from my angle. The woman then straightens up, not noticing, and they straighten up, too. This happens over and over a few times. The toddler has gone quiet. Finally, the printer prints out the woman’s receipt.)

Me: “Here you go.”

Woman: “Thanks!” *to toddler* “Come on.”

(They left, the toddler staring at the couple with a grin. The couple acted like nothing strange had happened. Maybe they really were acrobats?)


The Mother Of All Complainers

| Cleveland, OH, USA | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior, Money, Popular

(I work at a restaurant where a server has to pay the bill if a customer walks out. One day a customer arrives with his friends. The group decides to split the bill between them. One young man writes down the name of a friend and leaves the restaurant. After contacting him on Facebook, he agrees to pay. After a full run around that takes four to five days, he ultimately does not. I am having an unpleasant day, and do not feel like losing out, even for a small amount. I contact the police. Afterwards, his mother arrives to tell me off.)

Mother: “Just who the f*** do you think you are calling the police? You made me look like an idiot over eight dollars. You should feel ashamed about making such a problem over this.”

Me: “Your son wrote down the name of his friend and walked out. That isn’t acceptable. In here, we have to pay if someone walks out, and I don’t like losing out. Short of that, what he did was illegal.”

Mother: *screaming* “How DARE you? My child wouldn’t do such a thing, and you harassed him over some imaginary crime and made a big problem out of seven dollars? It’s eight dollars. It means nothing!”

Me: “If it’s nothing, then would you kindly pay? I need to work, and you’re scaring the other patrons.”

Mother: *ear-splitting shrieks* “I will not. Quit making problems for good people. I don’t have the time for this.”

(The manager walks up.)

Manager: “Ma’am, I have to ask you to leave. You are causing a disturbance.”

Mother: “I’ll make as much noise as I want until this b**** stops complaining about her imaginary money!”

(Shortly after the police were contacted, and two officers dragged her out. She tried to come back twice, but she was informed if she showed up again she would be detained.)


Whatever Ice-Cream Floats Your Boat

| ON, Canada | At The Checkout, Bizarre, Food & Drink

(I’m the customer in this one. My siblings, my boyfriend and I go to a fast food joint late at night. Everyone wants ice cream floats! We get to the cashier, everyone orders what they want and now it’s my turn…)

Cashier: “And what kind of pop would you like?”

(I thought all floats were default root beer and vanilla ice cream, so when she asks, my brain is just like NOPE and flat-lines. I don’t know what happened but I just kinda… forgot I was getting a root beer float because the question broke my brain.)

Me: “Uh… Coke?”

Cashier: *looks at me* “… and type of ice cream?”

Me: “Chocolate.”

(My siblings are like, what is wrong with you? I went beet red from embarrassment and everyone, including the cashier, was laughing. I shrug it off and said I was doing it on purpose. It wasn’t awful… but I really wished it was root beer and vanilla. I was totally not drinking or high, but probably made that girl’s night!)

Page 9/357First...7891011...Last