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Category: At The Checkout

The customer has seemed normal and maybe even intelligent throughout the shopping purchase. But then they get to the checkout and as soon as human interaction is required it all falls apart. The checkout operators really are our first line of defense against the stupid customer!

Shot Himself In The Foot

| NV, USA | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior, Criminal & Illegal

(I’m a cashier in a sporting goods store. All of our more expensive products – anything from firearms and ammo to football gloves and high-end sunglasses – are kept behind a counter that is separate from the registers and located right next to the manager’s office. The managers are the only ones who have the keys to the knife drawers and gun cabinets, but any employee can handle small stuff like ammo and sunglasses. Customers are NOT allowed to get their own ammo – only a store associate can grab it for them and it MUST be brought up to the registers by that associate to prevent theft.)

Me: “Hi there! How can I help you today?”

Customer: “Ammo. I have a BB gun and I need the ammo for it.”

Me: “Absolutely! If you go back over there—” *points to gun counter* “—I’ll call someone over and they can help you.”

Customer: “Thanks!”

(He heads over to the counter and I intercom one of my managers to help him. As soon as I hang up the phone, a line starts up at my register, so I begin working through the line. A few minutes later, I see one of my coworkers slip behind me and set a package of BBs on my counter, with the customer following right behind them.)

Me: “Find everything all right?”

Customer: “Yeah, but I’m a bit upset at your manager. He barked at me while I was over there.”

Me: “I’m sorry, sir.”

Customer: “Yeah, he snapped at me for going behind the counter.”

Me: “…”

Customer: “Yeah, I got tired of waiting, so I went back there and grabbed them off the shelf.”

(From the time I sent him over to the counter to the time he walked back to my register, a whopping two minutes had passed, hardly a long wait for a store our size. I was honestly stunned that my head manager hadn’t killed him, or at least tackled him to the ground, for pulling a stunt like that.)

Me: “Again, I’m sorry, sir.” *finishes transaction* “Have a nice day.”

(Once he left, I turned to my coworker and frowned, pondering how he managed to rationalize the act of going behind the gun counter of a national sporting goods retailer and NOT think it was a bad idea.)

No ID, No Idea, Part 22

| Norway | At The Checkout, Underaged

(I’m at our local grocery store, buying some snacks and alcoholic beverages. The drinking age here is 18, and the store policy is to check the ID of anyone who looks younger than 25. Since I’ve used the same store my entire life, most of the cashiers know me and don’t bother to ID me. The customer behind me, who is also purchasing alcohol, has been glaring at me through the entire transaction. It’s her turn.)

Cashier: “I’ll need to see an ID, please.”

Customer: “Why do you need that?”

Cashier: “Store policy.” *points to sign*

Customer: *points to me* “You didn’t check her ID, and I’m clearly older than her. I’m not even sure she’s legal.”

Cashier: “She is. ID, please.”

Customer: “No! Not until you ID HER.” *glares at me*

Cashier: *sighs and turns to me* “[My Name], may I see an ID, please?”

Me: “Sure.” *hands over my university ID*

Cashier: “Oh, you’re at [University] now? How’s that going?” *hands my ID back*

Me: “It’s great, thanks for asking. Say ‘hi’ to your parents for me.” *I turn to leave*

Cashier: “You too!” *to customer* We’ve known each other since we were six. ID, please.”

Related:
No ID, No Idea, Part 21
No ID, No Idea, Part 20
No ID, No Idea, Part 19

How To Narrowly Avoid An Argument

, | Sydney, NSW, Australia | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior

(It is late at night and I have been in the order taker booth in the drive-thru. The lane itself can be narrow at some points and many customers sometimes struggle in navigating it. A customer drives up and I can see that he has trouble navigating the drive-thru lane.)

Customer: “Your drive-thru is really narrow. You should fix it.”

Me: *with a weird look* “Well, I didn’t design the bloody thing 30-plus years ago, so why are you telling me?”

(The customer then remained silent during the rest of the transaction and drove off.)