You Can’t Put Music In A Box

, , , , , | Right | July 3, 2017

(We have a customer call from out of state wanting to order a guitar for his nephew.)

Caller: “I’m looking at your listing online for this guitar. I really like it and would like to buy it and have it shipped to my nephew in a different state. Is that okay?”

Me: “That’s no problem. We’d be happy to help you with that.”

Caller: “First I want to see pictures of the actual guitar, though.”

Me: “All the pictures you see on our website are pictures of this guitar.”

Caller: “No. I know the pictures are of that model, but I want to see pictures of the actual guitar.”

Me: “We take all the pictures on our website ourselves. These are not stock photos. They are pictures of the guitar hanging on the wall in our store right now.”

Caller: “Oh, okay… Wait. The guitar is hanging on the wall right now?”

Me: “Yes. All of our guitars hang on wall displays so they can be viewed by customers.”

Caller: “So this isn’t a brand new guitar like the website says?”

Me: “No, sir, it is brand new. We just received it from the manufacturer this year. It has not had an owner yet, and is definitely still brand new.”

Caller: “But it’s hanging on the wall! You took it out of the box!”

Me: “Sir, all guitar stores hang their guitars on the wall. Aside from a few child sized guitars and ukuleles we carry, our guitars do not come in boxes. They only arrive in shipping boxes, which we discard after opening. Many of them come with cases, but not boxes.”

Caller: “But you took the guitar out of the box! Now it’s not new! I demand a discount for the unboxed guitar.”

Me: “I think there has been some confusion. Guitars aren’t like blenders or microwaves. They don’t come with boxes. We don’t have floor models with extra boxed inventory in the back. Guitars are an entirely different product that has to be played, seen, heard, and held to help customers make a decision about whether or not to purchase it.”

Caller: “You took it out of the box, so it is not new. I will not pay new pricing for a guitar that has been played by other people.”

Me: “Sir, I am very sorry, but I do not know what else to tell you. I can sell you this guitar, but I cannot discount it, because it is new. Our dealer agreement with the manufacturing company says that we cannot discount this item for at least two years or we could lose our dealer license.”

Caller: “I don’t care. You will give me a discount.”

Me: “I’m sorry, sir, but I cannot. You can either buy this guitar full priced, plus pay for shipping for us to send it to your nephew, or you can try contacting the manufacturer. I have to warn you, though; this particular guitar is extremely popular, so it is currently back-ordered, and you could have to wait up to seven months to finally get it. But they will make you pay the exact same price we will.”

Caller: “Well, I’m sure they’d send me a real new guitar in it’s box.”

Me: “It will be sent to you in a shipping box.”

Caller: “What about its box?”

Me: “Again, sir, guitars do not come in boxes like appliances do.”

Caller: “Well, we’ll see about that. You just lost yourself a sale.” *click*

(Later that day we got another call.)

Caller #2: “Hi, my uncle called earlier today about a guitar for my birthday.”

Me: “Yes, he spoke to me. How can I help you?”

Caller #2: “Well, I just wanted to know why the guitar doesn’t come in a box.”

Me: “As I explained to your uncle, guitars do not come in boxes the way other products do. When we receive them, they come in a shipping box. If they have a case then they usually come inside the case inside the box.”

Caller #2: “So can we get a discount because you guys decided to take the guitar out of its box and put it on the wall?”

Me: “Not unless the guitar were dropped several times and the quality damaged.”

Caller #2: “Oh…”

Me: “I’m sorry. I know you are interested in this guitar, but because it is new and from a manufacturer that we deal for, we cannot discount this guitar AT ALL for two years unless it is accidentally damaged, is bought and returned, or if there is a manufacturer defect. None of which apply to this particular guitar.”

Caller #2: “Okay. Thanks anyway.”

(The original caller ended up attempting to purchase the guitar the next day through our website; however our online monitoring system ended up flagging the order for suspicious activity. Apparently this man had upset enough people to be put on a watch list for expensive transactions, as he often found a way to either have them unfairly discounted or would demand a refund for a faulty product that he would refuse to return. The second caller’s mother bought the guitar for her son for his birthday, but not before telling us how sorry she was for her brother’s behavior.)

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