Candy Crushed Your Chances Of Leaving On Time

, , , , , | Right | December 10, 2017

(I work at a “luxury” brand candy store in a mall. We wait until mall security calls the mall closed or our register says it is closing time, whichever happens first. It’s still about five minutes until the store closes. I’m up front cleaning, waiting to shut the doors, while my manager is at the register counting out damaged product for the day; fresh goods need to be thrown out at the end of the day. A woman walks in and I greet her. She walks straight to the bulk candy counter by the register. Only employees can access it, as it opens behind the registers. My manager stops counting to help her.)

Customer: “I’d like a small box.”

Manager: *pulling out the box* “Sure! What would you like?”

(Bulk boxes can be rung up with one of two codes. The first code is a set price, the average price by weight of a box that size. The second code prompts us to weigh the box and put in the specific price. The company has guidelines about when each code should be used. During busy hours, we use the first code, but most of the time we use whichever code will most benefit the customer. The second code price always comes within $0.25 of the first code price.)

Customer: *takes a few minutes, but ultimately points out standard-sized pieces*

Manager: *closes box and walks straight to the register*

Customer: “Aren’t you going to weigh that?”

Manager: “A box this size is almost always $16.00 with the pieces you chose. I can definitely weigh it for you, and give you the price by weight if it’s cheaper.”

Customer: “I’d like that.”

Manager: *weighs box* “The display states it’s $15.75.”

Customer: “See? You would have overcharged me by $0.25.”

Manager: “Yes. I’m sorry, ma’am.”

(They continue the transaction with appropriate upselling, loyalty card, other corporate nonsense, etc. By this point I have heard security announce that the mall is closed. I’m done cleaning, so I straighten the shelves while waiting for the customer to leave so I can shut the doors.)

Manager: “Will that be all?”

Customer: “Now, I came in here last week and bought the same box. I’d like you to take $0.25 off for overcharging me last week, as well.”

Me: *internally* “Oh, dear God, no.”

Manager: “I’m sorry, but I can’t do that.”

Customer: “Why not? You didn’t weigh it last week, and I overpaid. You should refund me the difference.”

Manager: “While each piece is made to be uniform, sometimes they vary by weight. I could make another box like the one you just ordered and it could be $16.25. There’s no way for me to know how much the box you ordered last week might have weighed.”

Customer: “Well, I don’t think that’s very fair. You should always weigh it.”

Manager: “I understand, ma’am, but boxes like these usually weigh out to $16.00. You can always ask us to weigh the box when you come in, though. Is there anything else I can do for you?”

Customer: “Aren’t you going to lower the price to $15.50?”

Manager: “I’m sorry, but I can’t do that.”

Customer: “Why not?”

Manager: “Because I don’t have the box you ordered last week to weigh out for you.”

Customer: “But you overcharged me by $0.25 last week!”

Manager: “Without the box present, I can’t know that.”

Customer: “But it was the exact same thing I ordered tonight!”

Manager: “Two of the same pieces can vary by weight a bit. You might have been undercharged last week.”

Customer: “But that’s not fair! It’s just $0.25! Why can’t you just give me my $0.25?! I shop here all the time! You should give me the difference for last week, as well!”

Manager: “Do you have a receipt from your purchase?”

Customer: “No! I shouldn’t need one! I’m in here all the time! You should give me my money back for last week!”

Manager: “I’m sorry, but I can’t just lower the price for you.”

Customer: *starts walking out* “I will never come back here! You are going to lose a customer over $0.25!”

(The manager does not respond, and the customer walks out. I pick up my cleaning supplies and turn to close the door, but before I can close it, the customer storms back in and marches up to the counter. The manager and I look at each other.)

Manager: “Did you want to purchase this?” *holds up the box she ordered*

Customer: “I don’t think you’re being very fair! How can you keep overcharging people and not feel bad?! All I want is my $0.25 back from what you overcharged me last week!”

Manager: “I can’t process a refund without a receipt, and I can’t know how much the box you bought last week would have weighed.”

Customer: “This is no way to treat loyal customers! I buy things here all the time! I can’t believe that you’re willing to lose a customer over $0.25! It’s just $0.25!”

Manager: “I’m sorry, but there’s nothing I can do for you unless you want to buy this.” *holds up box again*

Customer: “Absolutely unbelievable! You won’t do anything to help me!”

Manager: “I’m sorry, but those are company rules.”

Customer: “I can’t believe this! It’s just $0.25! You should be willing to treat a loyal customer with respect. You should give me back the money you overcharged me! You’re just soldiers of the company!” *storms out*

Me: *runs to the front and closes the door* “Did she just call us ‘soldiers of the company’?”

Manager: *starts unpacking the box and putting pieces back* “Yeah.”

Me: “Are you Lieutenant [Manager] now, or what?”

Manager: “I guess so.”

(For the next week, we referred to everyone by military ranks, and made ridiculous weapon titles for the different products. The customer actually worked for a store nearby in the mall and quickly hurried past us every time she had a shift.)

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