Calling And Holding Is Not Their Calling

, , , | Right | June 20, 2017

(I’m sitting in a coworker’s office when the phone rings. My coworker picks it up and has the following conversation:)

Coworker: “[Business]. This is [Coworker]. How can I help you?”

Patient: “Yes, is there an Amanda there?”

Coworker: “No, I’m sorry there’s not an Amanda here. Can I have your name so I can find you in the system?” *Patient gives her name* “Great, how can I help you today?”

Patient: “She was a very nice young lady who helped me sign up for a program last year to help with paying for things…” *patient trails off*

Coworker: “Oh, yes, I do see that you’re signed up for the [Program] for last year. If you want to re-enroll, you’ll need to call them and have them send some paperwork out to you.”

Patient: “I have to call them?”

Coworker: “Yes, you need to call them.”

Patient: “But you did it for me last year!”

Coworker: “I’m sorry, they won’t talk to us; they need to talk to you.”

Patient: “Fine.” *hangs up*

(Less than five minutes later the phone rings again. It’s the same patient.)

Coworker: “How can I help you?”

Patient: “I tried calling, but I had to wait on hold for so long and I can’t do that. Can you do this for me?”

Coworker: “No, ma’am, you need to do this yourself.”

Patient: “But I can’t hold on for so long! Can’t you call them and wait for me?”

Coworker: “No, ma’am, they won’t talk to us. They need to talk to you. You need to call and wait on hold.”

Patient: “But I’ve got the flu and I can’t hold for so long.”

Coworker: “Maybe you can call again in a couple of days when you feel better.”

Patient: “But can’t you call for me?”

Coworker: “No, you need to do this yourself.”

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