Acting Like A Call Of Duty Douche

, , , , , , | Working | July 16, 2018

(I work in video game publishing as a producer. One day we get pitched a game that we decide after a lot of discussion just isn’t a fit for us — for a lot of reasons, ranging from tone to cost vs. scope — but might work for another publishing company we’re friendly with. Up to this point, I have spoken with the lead programmer once before on the phone to ask questions, and he was friendly and polite. I call him back to tell him our decision, as well as to ask if he’d like us to send his information along to someone who might be a better fit.)

Me: “So, while we appreciate you reaching out to us about [Game], and we see enormous potential with it, we don’t feel we’re a fit for it. However, we do have a good relationship with another publisher who we think is more in line with your vision. If you like, we can send—”

Programmer: “You know what? F*** you, you dumb b****! What the f*** do you even know about games, anyway? Did you f*** your way into that job? Because you don’t sound like you’re qualified for more decision-making than which d**k to suck today! Dumb f****** b****!”

Me: *baffled silence* “Uh…”

Programmer: *sharp intake of breath* “Oh! I… I thought you had hung up already! B-but, uh, what were you saying about, um, another publisher?”

Me: “I was literally in the middle of talking. But I am hanging up now.”

(I was mostly just surprised at the complete flip in personality, and considered that we had dodged a bullet working with this guy. He tried emailing me, saying he had just been kidding, and asking me to connect him with the other publisher. Then, when I ignored him, he tried emailing my coworkers and telling THEM to tell me he had just been “goofing.” Trust me, the complete fury and sheer volume of his voice meant he hadn’t been joking. The game never did get off the ground. from what I saw. Even if you’re upset about getting your project rejected, being unable to handle that and instead blowing up in a completely unprofessional manner just shows you don’t have the temperament or interpersonal skills to handle working with other people. I’m just glad he showed his true colors before I connected him with another company; those professional relationships are important no matter what industry you’re in, and, “Hey, why did you recommend us this guy who was, in reality, an actual lunatic?” isn’t a great look.)

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