A Parking Spot Of Bother, Part 2

, , , , | Right | December 27, 2020

There’s a public park next to our store situated on a popular walking trail. During this particular summer, the city has closed the public parking lot that gave you access to the trail due to road work, so people take it upon themselves to think that they can park in our parking lot — for free — and use the park. Most of the time, if they come in and purchase something, my boss — who also happens to be a lawyer — will let them park there. There are two incidents, however, that stick out in my mind.

A woman with THAT haircut parks in our lot and goes to the park. My boss comes outside.

Boss: “You can’t park in our lot if you’re not a customer.”

She starts screaming and yelling at us.

Woman: “I’ll be sending a letter to the city mayor about this!”

Boss: “Go ahead. You send her a letter and I will send her two.”

The second incident involves a man who parks his car DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF OUR WINDOWS and then tries walking to the park.

Boss: “Sir, you need to move your car.”

Man: “No.”

Boss: “Either you need to move the car or I will move it for you.”

Man: “No.”

He then ignores my boss and waves him off.

My boss gets our large commercial truck we use to move things and parks it directly behind this man’s car. Then, he gets on the phone and calls a tow truck. The man comes over and begins complaining.

Boss: “Are you going to move it now?”

Finally, after much complaining, he agrees to move his car.

I get that the city had no backup plan for parking and many of the people who wanted to use this park could not because they didn’t want to purchase anything from our store. The city’s lack of planning isn’t everyone else’s fault, but still, I wonder to this day: why do people think that because a city closed the public parking lot it gives them the right to park wherever they want?

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A Parking Spot Of Bother

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