Unfiltered Story #32414

North Carolina | Unfiltered | July 3, 2016

(I’ve always loved reading, even when I couldn’t read well on my own I would beg other people to read to me. By the time I reached third grade, I was on an eighth grade reading level. I also had a habit of pulling out a book and reading at my desk if I finished an in-class assignment early, or if the teacher had stepped out of the room, etc. Halfway through the year, my third grade science/math teacher figured out what I was doing and actually called my parents in for a conference, without actually telling them what the problem was.)

Mom: (Expecting something horrible.) Why did you need to see us, Mrs. [Teacher]?

Teacher: (Gives me a stern look where I’m sitting between my parents.) I have to inform you that [my name] has been disrupting class.

Dad: Really? That’s not like her. How so?

Teacher: (Still stern) She has been reading during class.

Mom and Dad: …

Mom: You mean, reading when she should be doing her work?

Teacher: Well, no, she’s been doing it after finishing her assignments or if the class is on a break.

Dad: So…what’s the problem?

Teacher: (Realizing she’s not getting the reaction she wanted.) She’s also reading books that are far too advanced for her! There’s no way she should be reading full-length novels!

Mom: [My name] has *always* been and advanced reader, Mrs. [Teacher]. And honestly I’m surprised you would call both of us in to tell us our daughter is too good of a reader!

Dad: (Clearly not happy) If she’s still doing her work, and not keeping any other students from their work, how is that wrong? Do you know I had to take unpaid time off of work to come to this meeting?

Teacher: No, but she…I mean…

Mom: We’re leaving. (She takes my hand and we head for the door.) And if you try to tell our daughter she can’t read on her own quiet time again, we’ll be calling the principal.

Teacher: *speechless*

(I waved goodbye to her and we left. She never said anything else about me reading at school, but I could tell she was still upset my parents didn’t agree with her definition of “disruption”. Maybe what really bothered her is I didn’t want to do extra math work during my free time?)

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