Unfiltered Story #215171

, , | Unfiltered | November 13, 2020

Our house was located directly across the street from the parking lot driveway of a small liberal arts college dormitory–the back of the building.

Late one Saturday night/early Sunday AM, we heard a car alarm go off, sounded like right outside. Since it was spring, heading into summer and close to graduation, we had windows open–no air conditioning, which made the alarm seem like it was located practically under the bed. It shut itself off quickly, and other than a quick look outside, we figured “not our problem” and went back to sleep.

Car alarm went off again about 6 AM, and then, again and again, more and more frequently. This, as you may well guess, started to p*ss us off. We went outside to see what we could figure out.

We isolated the problem to a vehicle parked illegally in the yellow zone curb area by that driveway, and quickly figured out that the problem was 1) a car alarm set too sensitively and 2) increasing traffic on the street. Any time a car went by or turned into the driveway, the alarm went off.

Out of state plates, parked on a campus curb close to a dorm, we figured “student car,” SO we called campus security and gave them the plate number. Unfortunately, the car wasn’t registered as a student vehicle (common students who didn’t want to pay the yearly campus parking fee). Campus Security couldn’t do anything about it.

SO, we called the town PD. We gave them the plate number, told them that the car was, indeed, parked illegally, and they sent an officer to take a look. While the officer was there, the alarm was set off at least four times.

The officer wouldn’t even write the vehicle a ticket as a *courtesy* to Campus Security, even though the curb and street were city jurisdiction.

All day long, that d*mned alarm went off, any time a car drove past. At some point during the day, we composed a short and nasty note to place under the wiper blades, and decided it was time to go do something somewhere other than home for the afternoon. Mercifully, when we got back home, the offending car had been moved.