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    It’s A Bad Sign When They Have A Bad Sign

    | VT, USA | Crazy Requests, Money

    (I work at a large department store where there’s one sale a week on average. Because the sale prices are usually the same, our signing team leaves old signs behind the current ones so they don’t have to reprint every sign every time our prices change. Most customers don’t even think to look behind the visible sign, and those who do understand that the price they can see is the current price. A customer brings up a piece of one of our top brands of luggage, and a sign taken out of the sign holder.)

    Customer: “Hi, this sign was behind a sign that said they were full price, but the dates include today. Can I get it for half off?”

    (I look at the bottom of the sign, and see that in light gray print over white says ’121912 12513′.)

    Me: “Those are just identification numbers, but let me check the price for you.”

    (I bring the suitcase to a register and scan it. Just as the sign in front says, it rings up full price.)

    Me: “The sign is up for the sale that starts next week.”

    Customer: “So I can get it half off, right?”

    Me: “Unfortunately not, ma’am.”

    Customer: “But the sign says it’s half off.”

    Me: “You said this was behind a sign that gave the full price, right?”

    Customer: “Yes.”

    Manager: “So let me get this right: you pulled apart one of our signs, found one that isn’t current, and want that price?”

    Customer: “Yes! That’s what the sign says!”

    Me: “We can hold it for you until the sale starts.”

    Customer: “No! I have to take it to Atlanta tomorrow! I want the price the sign says! Can’t you just give it to me early?”

    Me: “If I did that, I could get fired.”

    Customer: “So…?”

    Me: “It’s full price.”

    (The customer leaves, muttering about false advertising.)