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    Category: Transportation

    Tire Of This Dispute

    | Raleigh, NC, USA | Family & Kids, Money, Transportation

    (I am in the waiting room at a local tire place. A pickup truck squeals into the parking lot. A guy storms out and into the store. He demands a manager so he could dispute his son’s tire bill.)

    Manager: “How can I help you, sir?”

    Guy: “My son was in here earlier today, and you overcharged him! It shouldn’t have been [first amount]; it should have been [second amount]!”

    Manager: “I quoted your son—as I do all customers—both amounts, sir. He chose the [first amount] option.”

    Guy: “No, you didn’t! He said that you only gave him the [second amount] option. That’s too much for the menial service you provided.”

    Manager: “I wouldn’t have done that, sir. I quoted him both options, and he chose the [second amount] option. He wanted, and I quote, ‘blingy-er rims’.”

    (The guy realizes that he hasn’t been overcharged, and stops looming over the manager.)

    Guy: “It just isn’t right that my boy has to use up his whole paycheck on tires! He’s a hardworking boy. It’s just isn’t right!”

    Manager: “No, sir. It just isn’t right that I should have to dock my own paycheck, just so your son can keep his paycheck intact.”

    Me: “That’s what paychecks are for, right? Paying someone for a well-deserved service and paying for necessities such as tires, right?”

    (The guy turns beet red and leaves. My manager turns to me.)

    Manager: “If he keeps squealing his tires like that, he’ll be back within the next month to get them replaced.”

    Radiating A Feeling Of Thanksgiving

    | Kansas City, MO, USA | Awesome Workers, Family & Kids, Top, Transportation

    (I am a married father of three and money is tight. A few days before Thanksgiving, my truck develops a radiator leak. I really need my truck fixed on this particular Saturday. I find a local shop that is willing to take a look even though they are usually closed Saturdays.)

    Mechanic: “Okay, I found a pinhole leak in one of the side tanks on the radiator and should be able to fix it no problem. It will be about $45.”

    (I grimace at the cost, but have no choice.)

    Me: “Okay, do what you need to. I just need it fixed.”

    (After another 20 minutes…)

    Mechanic: “Well, I have good news and bad news. The hole is fixed but it turns out that the seal on the other side is leaking badly as well.”

    Me: “How much more will that cost to fix?”

    (He leans into the manager’s office and asks how much.)

    Manager: “That would bring it up to $65.00… maybe more, depending on how we have to repair it.”

    Me: “Well, go ahead and fix it. I really need the truck running today.”

    (The mechanic goes back to fix it. My phone rings and it’s a friend. )

    Friend: *on the phone* “How bad is the truck? How much will it cost?”

    (I proceed to tell him the truck’s condition and cost, and add…)

    Me: “…this really hurts because it’s coming out of our grocery money for the week.”

    (After my truck is fixed, the mechanic comes in to speak with the boss.)

    Mechanic: “Alright, it’s all fixed and ready to go. Boss? How much do I charge him?”

    Manager: *to me* “Where is your car parked? Front or back?”

    Me: “Out front.”

    Manager: *to the mechanic* “Take it out front and put it in his trunk for him. No charge.”

    Me: “What? Are you serious?”

    Manager: “As a heart attack. You go enjoy your Thanksgiving with your family, and Happy Holidays!”

    (In shock and disbelief, I leave the shop with the mechanic, load up with my son, and leave. It dawns on me five minutes into the drive I forgot to even say thank you! I went back the following Monday and thanked him profusely and took a stack of business cards with me. I now recommend them to anyone who has car troubles. And they say kindness is dead in our modern age.)

    A Directionless Conversation

    | Canada | Bigotry, Transportation

    (I am 16. I work in a car dealership’s customer service department on weekends.)

    Me: “Service department, [name] speaking, how may I help you?”

    (An elderly customer answers.)

    Customer: “I’m having a hard time finding your dealership. Can someone give me directions?”

    Me: “Sure, can you tell me where you are now?”

    (I begin giving her directions when she interrupts me.)

    Customer: “No, I need someone else to give me directions.”

    Me: “I know exactly where you are, and it’s very easy to get here. All you have to do is—”

    Customer: “No. No, I need a man to give me directions.”

    Me: “Excuse me?”

    Customer: “I need a man to give me directions.”

    Me: “Okay, just give me a moment.”

    (I page my male co-worker, but he is busy with another customer.)

    Me: “Ma’am, I’m sorry, but he’s busy. Can I give you directions now?”

    Customer: “No, I need to speak to a man. I’ll wait.”

    (I go talk to another co-worker and explain the situation. He answers the phone and gives her directions. Twenty minutes later, she arrives.)

    Me: “Good afternoon.”

    Customer: “Ugh, I had the hardest time getting here.”

    Me: “Oh, really? Which way did you go?”

    (She explains.)

    Me: “If I were you I would have gone this way…”

    (I once again explain the exact same directions I gave to her on the phone.)

    Customer: “Well, that would have been so much easier! I wish I had gotten you on the phone!”

    Me: “Actually, you did. Please help yourself to a complimentary beverage.”

    (The lady blushes and then hurries to our waiting room.)

    The Drive To Do Good

    | Woodbridge, VA, USA | Awesome Customers, Bad Behavior, Religion, Transportation

    (I am a habitual rider of the local transit system that covers DC metro and northern VA. I board the bus to see a rider verbally assaulting the bus driver.)

    Rider: “I don’t care about your timeline route. You were supposed to go to [street] to drop me off 45 minutes ago. That last driver missed my stop and your operator assured me I would be home on this bus by 6:25!”

    Driver: “Ma’am, I cannot directly deviate from my route until I’m closer to your stop. To deviate now would be to leave any other potential riders along the route stranded in the cold. I am truly sorry that you are having a bad evening due to a coworker, and I’ll do what I can.”

    Rider: “Do what you can?! Do I look like the normal low-element that ride this bus? I am an educated woman with a job working for the federal government. Do look like I’m another one of your lowlife un-educated passengers?”

    Driver: “Ma’am, I am a faithful man, and I know that God doesn’t give you us more than we can handle. For every negative that happens, he provides a positive. It is my prayer that when you get home tonight that you have a present evening.”

    (This quiets her down considerably after that. Before I got off I handed him a note I wrote him with a $10 bill in it that read…)

    “Sir.

    Yours is one of the hardest jobs in the county. It good to know that you are a man of faith, and you’re right about God balancing the books, but until then here’s a down payment on some fortune for you.”

    The Drive To Do Good

    | Dublin, Ireland | Awesome Workers, Theme Of The Month, Top, Transportation

    (I have a bunch of friends over for a concert, and we all stay at the same place in South County Dublin, about 20 minutes from the City Centre. It is almost midnight by the time we get to the bus stop. Dublin Bus provides a free shuttle service to the concert, but by that time all the free shuttle buses are gone. Just then, an out of service bus arrives.)

    Bus Driver: “Hm, there’s a lot of you left here. Tell you what: we’ll just pretend I’m a shuttle.”

    Me: “Sorry, when’s the next Nightlink?

    Bus Driver: “That just left; the next one’s at 02:00 h. You might have to get a cab.”

    (I try to call Enquiries for a cab company, but can’t because my phone is out of battery. My friends are all from abroad and therefore don’t have Irish Enquiry numbers on their phones. The bus driver overhears our increasingly worried conversation and gives me his phone. At this stage we’re almost at Trinity College, where the shuttle terminates.)

    Me: “Thanks, are you going on to Donnybrook Garage?”

    Bus Driver: “Yeah, don’t worry. You can stay on.”

    (I try to get a cab, but am told by the cab company that they can’t send out a seven-seater to the bus garage but we should just flag one down—pretty much an impossibility.)

    Me: *to my friends* “S***, we’ll have to flag one down… or two, rather.”

    (At this stage, the only people left on the bus are me, my friends and one guy on the back bench. We’re all getting seriously worried about getting home.)

    Bus Driver: “Right, so where are you all going?”

    Me: “Deansgrange!”

    Guy on the back bench: “Dun Laoghaire!”

    (Both these suburbs are off the same main road, about three miles apart.)

    Bus Driver: “Shag it, I’ll drop you all home!”

    (The driver dropped us, and presumably the guy from Dun Laoghaire, all the way to our respective street corners, thus staying on about half an hour after his shift ended and going out of his way about 10 miles there and back. All we had to repay him for his awesomeness was one of our homemade message board badges commemorating the concert meet-up and half a Duty Free bag of gummi bears, and he accepted them with a smile. That’s why I love this country.)

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