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    Category: Family & Kids

    The Son Will Come Up, Tomorrow

    | Denver, CO, USA | Awesome Customers, Family & Kids, Food & Drink

    (Note: I am currently two weeks into my new job, and am the newest employee on staff. I’m working the drive-thru.)

    Me: “Welcome to [coffee shop]. I hope you’re having a great morning! Can I take your order?”

    Customer: “I want a nonfat venti latte, seven pumps of vanilla, extra whipped cream, and you’d better make it fast, b****! I can’t believe you folks are so slow. This is a DRIVE-THRU! I shouldn’t even have to stop my car!”

    Me: *mortified* “We’ll have that right up for you. Please pull around for your total.”

    (When the car reaches the window, I see that the woman’s adult son, a regular customer, is driving the car.)

    Customer’s Son: “I’m so sorry about my mother. She’s a cranky old b**** who doesn’t know how to shut her mouth. Thanks for the coffee. Here’s a tip for putting up with her bulls***!”

    (He drops a ten-dollar bill into our tip jar before driving off. He now comes back as a regular customer each morning—without his mother. He always tips generously and has something nice to say to me!)

    Their Bark Is Worse Than Any Dog’s Bite

    | San Diego, CA, USA | Crazy Requests, Family & Kids, Pets & Animals

    (I work at a pet store that also offers boarding/day care services for dogs. We have three day camps, two of which are visible to customers inside and outside of the store. I am on my way back from a break when I notice a father, mother, and child standing in front of a window, looking into one of the day camps.)

    Me: “Hello! I see you have noticed one of our day camp rooms. Do you have any questions about our boarding and day camp services?”

    Father: “Yes, we do. What is that dog?” *points*

    Me: “That would be Oso. He’s a real sweetheart.”

    Father: “And what breed is he?”

    Me: “He’s a Great Pyrenees mix.”

    Mother: “We’ll take him.”

    Me: “…I’m sorry?”

    Mother: “I SAID, we’ll take him.”

    Me: “I’m sorry, but these dogs are not for sale.”

    Father: “What?”

    Me: “All of these dogs are staying with us while their owners are out of town. Some of them, like Oso, only come in for a few hours every day because the owners don’t want them to be left home alone all day.”

    Mother: “That’s ridiculous. Why would you have these dogs on display if they weren’t for sale?”

    Father: “We’d like to purchase that dog. How much is he?”

    Me: “I’m sorry, but none of these dogs are for sale. We do offer adoption services on weekends, so you are more than welcome to come back on Saturday and look at the puppies.”

    Child: *whining* “I want the dooooggiiiiiiie!”

    Father: “Yes, but we want THAT dog. How much is he?”

    Me: “Sir, I’m sorry, but none of these dogs are for sale. They all have owners.”

    Mother: “Then how about that dog?” *points at a different one*

    Me: “I don’t know what that dog’s name is.”

    Mother: “No, no, how much is that dog? If the first one isn’t for sale, then what about this one?”

    Me: “Ma’am, NONE of the dogs are for sale. They ALL have owners.”

    Mother: “Then why are you displaying them in the store if they aren’t for sale?!”

    Child: “I WANT THE DOGGIE!”

    Me: “Excuse me, but I need to clock back in from break. Let me get the manager…”

    (When the store manager came by, they asked how much Oso was again. When they were told he was not for sale, the child threw a major temper tantrum, both of the parents starting yelling at the store manager, and they only left after the store manager threatened to call security.)

    Dim Witted And Off The Deep End, Part 6

    | San Antonio, TX, USA | Family & Kids

    (I’m a lifeguard at a large pool in San Antonio. We don’t allow anyone who can’t swim to jump from the diving boards. This particular day, we have two parties, both 40 people large. A young girl is about to jump off the board and has already been told she cannot be in the pool, due to inappropriate swimwear. Her mother approaches me.)

    Mother: “Excuse me, would you mind keeping an eye on my daughter?”

    Me: “Don’t worry, ma’am, it’s my job to watch her, but if I remember correctly, your daughter’s already been told not to get in the pool. She’s not wearing a swimsuit.”

    Mother: “Oh, don’t worry, she’ll only go off once. Just watch her. She can’t swim.”

    (I proceed to blow my whistle and tell the girl to step down. When she walks over, the mother is absolutely livid.)

    Me: “Your daughter’s been told already ma’am. She shouldn’t even be in the pool. Besides that, we don’t allow anyone that can’t swim to go off the boards.”

    Mother: “Are you f***ing kidding me?! This is f***ing ridiculous! All you have to do is watch my f***ing daughter go off the board and make sure she doesn’t drown. How hard is your godd*** job?! Where’s your manager?!”

    (My manager is called over and I explain the situation.)

    Manager: *to the mother* “Let me get this straight: you want my guard to be ready to save your daughter, who can’t swim, instead of just now allowing her off the board, like he’s trained to do?”

    Mother: *blank stare*

    Manager: “Just leave.”

    Related:
    Dim Witted And Off The Deep End, Part 5
    Dim Witted And Off The Deep End, Part 4
    Dim Witted And Off The Deep End, Part 3
    Dim Witted And Off The Deep End, Part 2
    Dim Witted And Off The Deep End

    Common Courtesies: Not For Commoners, Part 2

    | New York, USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Wild & Unruly

    (A couple and their 5-year-old child comes into my 20 items or less lane. However, they have a large, overflowing cart with clearly more than 20 items.)

    Me: “Hi, I’m sorry but are you aware this lane is 20 items or less?”

    Customer: “Does it matter? Take care of us!”

    (The customer starts unloading her items on the tiny counter. Meanwhile, her child is standing in the cart and starts throwing things.)

    Me: *to the customer’s child* “Alright, sweetie, please don’t throw things.”

    Customer: “Excuse me? Don’t you dare tell my kid what to do!”

    Me: “Ma’am, he’s throwing things. He could hurt—”

    (At this point the kid hefts up a very large can of broth and throws it at me, hitting me in the face.)

    Customer’s Child: *laughs*

    Customer: “Oh! Isn’t he cute?! Good job sweetie! We don’t treat these people nice. It’s good to learn early to make them shut up!”

    (Another cashier took over for me so I could attend to my injuries, but before security could get there they had left the store. Thankfully nothing was broken, but I had a pretty bashed up looking face for a while!)

    Related:
    Common Courtesies: Not For Commoners

    Suffocatingly Insufferable

    | Michigan, USA | Family & Kids, Health & Body

    (I work in an enclosed collision center where the customer can drive in for an estimate. We therefore ask all customers to turn off their vehicle while it’s inside to prevent the fumes from building up.)

    Me: “Hello, ma’am! Can you please turn your vehicle off and we can start the estimate?”

    Customer: “No, I will not! My children are in the car. It is far too hot for them!”

    Me: “We have to have the vehicle turned off. The fumes can build up in here very quickly making everyone—including your children—very sick.”

    Customer: “I care that my children are too HOT. I don’t care if they get SICK!”

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