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    Category: Family & Kids

    Customer Service Is Its Own Reward

    | TX, USA | Family & Kids, Technology, Top

    (I have been talking to a father and son for roughly an hour about many different headsets, so that they can weigh all the pros and cons and decide on the best pair for them.)

    Father: “Okay, we’ll take two of the [headsets].”

    Me: “I’m sorry, sir, but we actually don’t have those in stock. We sold our last one today. I can check to see if somewhere nearby does if you’d like?”

    Father: “Oh yes, absolutely!”

    (I check in the system, and let him know the nearest store that has two of the headsets he wants.)

    Father: “Thank you so much. Do I mention your name when I get there?”

    Me: “No, sir, just ask for the headsets. They’ll pull them right out for you.”

    Father: “But don’t you get credit somehow? You told me everything, and I’m not even buying from you.”

    Me: “No, sir, we don’t. I really appreciate that you notice this, but I’m very happy to have directed you to a product you enjoy. It really makes my day just for you to want us to be credited with the sale.”

    (The son pulls the father to the side and begins talking, then the two exit the store after waving and expressing their thanks. Around two hours later, I notice them come back in the store.)

    Me: “Welcome back! Did something happen?”

    Father: “Oh no. We got everything just fine. They had just what we wanted, but we felt so bad that you don’t get anything out of the deal, so we got this for you.”

    (The son hands me a gift card.)

    Me: “Wow, thank you! I can’t believe you did this. This is so nice!”

    Son: “It’s not fair that you helped us, and we didn’t help you. I had extra allowance money.”

    (I shake the father’s hand and give the son a big hug. I have the biggest smile on my face, and I praise them for being such wonderful people. It’s gestures like these that make me so happy to provide customer service where it’s needed.)

    Acting Like A Cookie Monster

    | TN, USA | Family & Kids, Food & Drink

    (We have a regular at our restaurant, a 14-year-old, that bikes to our store and gets the same order about once a week. Everyone gets along with him well, and the owner likes him enough to give him free cookies with all of his lunches. The owner has just given him some free cookies.)

    14-Year-Old Regular: “Thanks a ton!”

    (Another customer sees this, and starts yelling.)

    Customer: “Why did that BRAT get free cookies? I DEMAND to know, AND get cookies complimentary with my order!”

    14-Year-Old Regular: “I always assumed I got them because I’m not a douche-bag of a customer, unlike someone else.”

    (The customer goes red and shuts up.)

    Owner: “Isn’t he cute?”

    Related:
    A Real Life Cookie Monster

    Easter Bunny Goes North

    | NC, USA | Family & Kids, Religion

    (I’m working as an Easter Bunny at a local mall. A little girl walks in and stands in front of me. I wave to her.)

    Girl: “Hi, Easter Bunny.”

    (I wave again; Easter Bunnies don’t talk.)

    Girl’s Mom: “Be sure to tell him what you want him to bring you!”

    Girl: “Oh yeah!”

    (There’s a pause. I raise my arms like I’m shrugging.)

    Girl: “Um… I want you to be sure to bring me lots of toys for Christmas…”

    Putting The Cuss Into Repercussions

    | Birmingham, England, UK | Bad Behavior, Family & Kids, Money

    (I overhear an employee and an older customer, who is accompanied by her grandson. She is trying to return an expensive toy.)

    Employee: “I can offer you a replacement or gift voucher, but without the receipt I can’t give you a cash refund.”

    Customer: “No, you’ll give me a refund in cash.”

    Employee: “I can’t do that without the receipt. If the toy is faulty I can replace it for you, or you can choose something else.”

    Customer: “No, you’ll give me £120 in cash, out of the till. End of.”

    Grandson: “Nana, you’re not allowed to say ‘end of’ to people.”

    Customer: “Shush, I’ll say what I like. I’m allowed to say what I like. They just don’t want to give me £120 out of the f****** till.”

    Grandson: “You’re not allowed to say the f-word, Nana!”

    Customer: “Shut up.”

    Employee: “I’m really sorry, but without your receipt I can’t do a cash refund. If you come back with your receipt we’ll be able to give you a refund.”

    Customer: “F*** off!”

    Grandson: *to employee* “I’m sorry my nana said that. She doesn’t know you’re not allowed to say the f-word.”

    The History Of Photography Doesn’t Quite Click

    | PA, USA | Family & Kids, History, School

    (I have a paid internship at a small, obscure history museum and battlefield. This site is so unknown that most locals don’t even know what war was fought here. A visitor comes in with her bored-looking teenage daughter.)

    Visitor: “Hi! My daughter’s history teacher gave her an assignment to come to a local historical site, and we thought we’d come here!”

    Me: “Great! It’ll be $5 a piece.”

    Visitor: “So, this is a Civil War battlefield, right?”

    Me: “Actually this battlefield was a part of Pontiac’s Rebellion, a Native American uprising that occurred in 1763, after the French and Indian War. If you follow me, I’ll take you back to our 13-minute video about the battle, and Pontiac’s Rebellion. It’s a great synopsis of the history surrounding the museum.”

    Visitor: “Wonderful!”

    (Our theater area is located at the very back of the exhibit, in an area that has blown-up photos of our annual battle re-enactments. I turn the video on.)

    Me: “I will be happy to answer any questions at the end of the video.”

    (At the end of the video, the visitor starts pointing at the re-enactment photos on the walls.)

    Visitor: “So, these photos are from the actual battle?”

    (The visitor’s daughter starts laughing.)

    Me: “These are actually from our annual battle re-enactment held every summer.”

    Visitor: “Where are the photos from the battle?”

    Me: “Photography would not be invented for about another 80 years or so. Actually the first American war with any photographs was the American Civil War.”

    Visitor: “Oh. When was the Civil War?”

    Me: “1861-1865.”

    Visitor: “When was this [battlefield's] war?”

    Me: “1763.”

    Visitor: “So, what war was this?”

    Me: “The French and Indian War.”

    Visitor: “So, how long was this war before the Civil War?”

    Me: *facepalm*

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