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    Category: Family & Kids

    The ‘D’ Is Silent, The Customer Won’t Be, Part 2

    | CA, USA | Criminal/Illegal, Family & Kids, Movies & TV

    (I am working at the box office of a movie theater when a woman approaches my coworker’s window with two clearly underage sons.)

    Customer: “Hi, I want two tickets to Django Unchained.”

    Coworker: “Umm, are you going to see the movie with them?”

    Customer: “No, I don’t want to see that movie.”

    Coworker: “Unfortunately, Django Unchained is an R-rated movie, and our company policy is that anyone who is under 17 years old has to be accompanied by an adult. I can’t sell you tickets for just them.”

    Customer: “What do you mean? That’s not fair. I shouldn’t have to buy a ticket for a movie I’m not going to.”

    Coworker: “No, ma’am, you would have to actually go into the theater with them.”

    Customer: “But I don’t want to see the movie! Fine then, I’ll buy a ticket for myself and then sell it to someone else in line who wants to see the movie!”

    Coworker: “I’m sorry, but you can’t do that either.”

    Customer: “I’m an adult! I can do whatever I want! I’m going to buy a ticket, and I’m going to sell it to someone else!”

    Coworker: “Listen, let me get you my manager to—”

    Customer: “I don’t want to talk to your manager! You’re not going to call him!”

    Customer’s Son: “Mom, it’s okay. We really don’t need to see the movie.”

    Coworker: *into walkie-talkie* “Can I get a manager to box?”

    Customer: “I told you I don’t want to talk to your manager! Fine, I’ll just sit there with my eyes closed!”

    (She purchases three tickets and goes inside. In the time it takes the customer to walk inside, the manager, who has heard everything, has come to the customer service counter at the box office. The customer walks straight up to my manager.)

    Customer: “So, I guess YOU’RE the one I’m supposed to show THIS to.”

    (The customer shoves her entire wallet with ID in my manager’s face.)

    Customer: “See?! I’m over 17!”

    Manager: “Ma’am, that isn’t the issue.”

    Customer: “Yes it is! He told me I couldn’t buy a ticket unless I’m over 17!”

    Manager: “The issue isn’t whether or not you’re 17. The issue is that your sons cannot see the movie without you watching it with them because it is an R-rated movie.”

    Customer: “But—”

    Manager: “This is not only a company policy, which is posted all over, but also the LAW. If we sell tickets to R-rated movies to anyone underage, we can be heavily fined or worse. I would be more than willing to refund all of your tickets if you do not wish to see the movie.”

    Customer: “I don’t understand what the issue is! I’m an adult! I’M OVER 17! I guess I’ll just have to watch the movie with my eyes closed and cover my ears!”
    Related:
    The ‘D’ Is Silent, The Customer Won’t Be

    Checks Are Out At The Checkout

    | Portland, OR, USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Money, Top

    (I am a cashier at a big grocery store. I have a customer in with her daughter in her mid-teens. The customer writes a check, but because of a store policy, a manager has to override an error that will pop up if the customer does not have at least $700 of checks in the system. My manager is at the check stand right next to me helping a customer, and knows that I need her assistance.)

    Customer: “I can’t believe this is happening again! This happened last time!”

    Me: “I’m sorry. Our system is just very particular. You must write a certain amount of checks or spend a certain amount of money every month in order for it to not need an ID and a manager override. I know it is a pain, and I’m sorry.”

    Customer: “Well this is just f****** ridiculous. I don’t think I’m going to shop here anymore.”

    Me: “Again, I’m sorry that we have to do this. My manager will be here in just a second; she just needs to finish helping another customer.”

    Customer: “And this is just so stupid because I’ve written checks here before!”

    Me: “I understand. Our system is just very picky when it comes to checks and—”

    (At this point the customer begins to dramatically flip through her checkbook, and shoves it in my face so I can see all of the entries.)

    Customer: “SEE?!”

    Me: “Again, I understand, but the system says you only have $300 in the system, and it needs at least $750. I know it is a bit ridiculous, but in the end it is for the company’s and your safety, and there isn’t really anything I can do about it.”

    Customer: “I know it’s not your fault, but—”

    (To my surprise, the customer’s daughter suddenly speaks up in my defense.)

    Customer’s Daughter: “Then why are you being such a b**** to her, mom? You are so embarrassing. Maybe you should use a debit card like normal people. I’ll be in the car waiting.”

    (The mother and I both stare in shock while my manager comes over and runs the check through with no further hassle. Sometimes, it’s nice when someone says exactly what you’re thinking, especially when you can’t say it yourself!)

    This Conversation Is Stuck In A Cycle

    | Omaha, NE, USA | Family & Kids

    (I work at a small bike shop. During the early spring, we get a lot of customers. I have only worked there a few months, and learn a lot from the owner. His son also works there, and many customers know him. The owner is helping a customer, and I am watching. When the owner goes back to get something for her, we find ourselves alone.)

    Customer: “Are you his daughter?”

    Me: “No, I’m just an employee.”

    Customer: “He has the cutest kids! But you are definitely the prettiest.”

    Me: “But I’m not his daughter.”

    Customer: “Then why did you say he was?”

    Me: “I didn’t. I’m just an employee.”

    (The owner comes back.)

    Owner: “Alright, [my name], if you would just put her information into the computer, that wo—”

    Customer: “See! You called her [my name]! That’s proof she’s your daughter! You shouldn’t teach her to lie!”

    Owner: “So just because I use her first name means I’m her father?”

    Me: “[Owner's name], it’s okay.”

    Customer: “You call him father! Do it! NOW!”

    Me: “I only call my father, father.”

    Customer: “You mean he’s not your father?”

    Me: “No.”

    Customer: “Well why didn’t you say so?”

    Adam And Leave

    | GA, USA | Bad Behavior, Family & Kids, Top

    (I’m escorting a young couple around the store, and helping them register for their upcoming wedding. I hear my manager announce a Code Adam—a missing child security protocol in the United States—for a small boy over the P.A. system. I apologize to the couple, and start to walk to my assigned section when the man speaks up.)

    Man: “Excuse me! We’re not done registering yet!”

    Me: “I am so sorry, but as you heard, there is a Code Adam in place right now. I need to go help find the child. Hopefully we’ll find him quickly, and once we do, I’ll come back to you and help you finish your registry.”

    Woman: “There are plenty of you working here; your coworkers can handle it. Besides, it is the fault of the parents for not paying attention to their little brats. Now, does this particular set come in stainless?”

    Me: “I’m sorry, but there is a little kid missing right now. I cannot just assume that he’s okay. You can still take a look around and see if there is anything else you like while we’re searching. Like I said before, I will come back to you all once the child is found.”

    Man: “Look b****, you obviously don’t get it. We’re ready to drop thousands of dollars with you guys for our wedding, as well as our new home. The least you can do is be more helpful and answer our questions. Otherwise, we’ll just go elsewhere.”

    Me: “Sir, you are free to take your business anywhere you’d like.”

    (I reach over and take the scan gun from the woman’s hand.)

    Me: “And you’re right, I should be more helpful. I’m going to go help the parents of the missing kid, who are probably in hysterics right now.”

    (I turn around and rush to my assigned area to begin searching for the missing boy. Luckily, I quickly find him building a pillow fort in our back stock room. The parents thanked me profusely, and I even received recognition from corporate!)

    He Only Wants The White Meat

    , | Manchester, England, UK | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Food & Drink, Language & Words, Top

    (I am working on a till at a popular fast food restaurant, where we serve fried chicken. One of the more popular drinks is a white chocolate milkshake. I have just finished handing out an order when a father and his son come up to the counter.)

    Me: “Hi there! Welcome to [name of restaurant]. Can I take your order?”

    Father: “Yes. Can I have a white chocolate chicken meal and a fried milkshake?”

    Me: *thinking I’ve misheard* “I’m very sorry; what did you say?”

    Father: *irritated* “A white chocolate chicken meal, and a fried milkshake!”

    (I look at the son, and we both exchange puzzled looks.)

    Father: “Look, it’s just a white chocolate chicken meal and a fried milkshake! What’s so hard—”

    (The son bursts out laughing; the father looks down confused.)

    Father: “What? You did want a white choco—”

    Son: “Dad! Think about what you just said!”

    Father: “I remember! A white chocolate chi—”

    (He suddenly realizes what he has said before, and covers his eyes with his hand.)

    Father: “I didn’t just say that, did I?”

    Son: “You did!”

    Father: “Very sorry about that. A white chocolate MILKSHAKE, and a fried chicken meal, please?”


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