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  • Category: At The Checkout

    The customer has seemed normal and maybe even intelligent throughout the shopping purchase. But then they get to the checkout and as soon as human interaction is required it all falls apart. The checkout operators really are our first line of defense against the stupid customer!

    Little Pony, Big Problem

    | USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Movies & TV, Theme Of The Month

    (I always try to make conversation with the customers, especially the kids. I notice that the young daughter of the family I’m ringing up is wearing a shirt bearing a picture of Fluttershy, one of the ponies from the new ‘My Little Pony’ cartoon.)

    Me: “I like your shirt, sweetheart! That’s Fluttershy, huh? Fluttershy’s my favorite pony!”

    (The little girl glares at me.)

    Me: “Is something wrong?”

    Girl: *crying* “You can’t have Fluttershy for your favorite, because Fluttershy is my favoritest pony ever, in the whole wide world! I like her way more than you could ever ever ever, and she’s my pony pal, not yours! I love Fluttershy, so you CAN’T!”

    Me: “Oh… uhm, can I say Pinkie Pie is my favorite then?”

    Girl: *sniffling, wiping her eyes* “Yeah. You can have Pinkie Pie.”

    The Light In A Polite Lite World

    | CT, USA | At The Checkout, Awesome Customers, Family & Kids, Theme Of The Month

    (I work at a convenience store with a pharmacy. I’ve been working there for just about a year, and have given up completely on meeting a customer who’s nice to me. While I’m ringing people out, a boy about the age of eight or nine walks up to my register by himself.)

    Boy: *places Xbox live card on the counter* “Just this, please.”

    Me: “Sure.”

    (I ring him up and give him his total. It’s about $20.)

    Boy: “I’m sorry; I have about $15 in cash, but the rest is in quarters. Is that okay?”

    Me: *smiling* “That’s fine. Now I won’t need quarters later.”

    (The boy smiles and counts out his change. I finish the transaction and hand him the receipt with his card.)

    Me: “There you go. Have a nice day.”

    Boy: *smiling politely* “Thank you very much. You have a nice day too!”

    (He waves and smiles as he walks out. That boy restores my faith in humanity. He is now a regular at our store and I always love seeing him, still as polite as ever!)

    Named And Shamed

    , | Sandy, UT, USA | At The Checkout, Criminal/Illegal, Funny Names, Top

    (My debit card has just gone missing. I think I left it at the gas station after I got gas earlier, and now I’m at work. My name is a European variation of a common American name, and though spelled similarly, is quite different. For example, Kristen versus Kirsten. As such, when people read my name, they often use the American version. One of my coworkers calls me over using my nickname.)

    Coworker: “Hey, can you come here a moment?”

    Me: “Sure, what’s up?”

    Coworker: “This guy’s trying to use his girlfriend’s card.”

    (The customer slides a credit card over that looks familiar.)

    Me: “Uhm, can I see your ID?”

    Customer: “It’s my girlfriend’s card; she’s out in the car. I can go get her.”

    Me: “What’s her name?”

    Customer: “Kristen [Last-Name].”

    Me: “Spell her first name.”

    Customer: “Why?”

    Me: “Please?”

    Customer: *sighs* “K R I S T E N.”

    Me: “I’m sorry, but she’s going to have to come in and authorize the purchase. I’ll keep the card in the back office until you get back.”

    Customer: “Give me the card, you b****!”

    Me: “I can’t do that when I know this card is stolen.”

    Customer: “It’s not stolen, c***! That’s my girlfriend’s card!”

    Me: “No. This is my card. As you can see, my name tag is spelled correctly, and you spelled it wrong. Also, if you were my boyfriend, I’d break up with you just for not knowing what my name was.”

    (I was very relieved to get my card back! Unfortunately, the customer had run up $300 worth of purchases, but luckily the restaurant I work at has a security camera, and we got his face on camera. I am later able to prove I didn’t make those purchases, so don’t have to pay for them!)

    Mom Is Bugging Out

    | Monroe, CT, USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Theme Of The Month, Top

    (My customer is a young high-school kid wearing a Pink Floyd t-shirt, hemp necklace, torn jeans, and sandals. He usually comes to my checkout line because I don’t give him a hard time when he buys a ton of munchies with very red eyes. This time he looks surprisingly sober.)

    Me: “Evening, pal, how’s it going?”

    Customer: “Ugh, not so great.”

    (He proceeds to put 16 cans of bug spray on the counter.)

    Me: “Yikes, got a bug problem?”

    Customer: “No, but my mom thinks we do. She doesn’t realize she accidentally ate one of my, uh, you know, special cookies, and I have to play along so she doesn’t figure out it’s not real.”

    (Years later, I returned to the area to find him wearing a suit and tie as store manager!)

    Honest About His Scam

    | IL, USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Liars & Scammers, Money, Theme Of The Month

    (An eight-year-old boy has been pulling the same scam about three days a week for almost a month. He comes to the checkout with a few items and is always around $2 short. He freezes like a deer in headlights when asked if he would like to put an item back or go get more money. He’s gotten the act down so well, almost every time another customer feels bad for him and offers him the $2.)

    Me: “Okay, the total is $12.12.”

    Child: “I only have a $10.”

    Me: “Do you want to put this back?” *holds up item* “It’s $2.19, so then you’d have enough.”

    Child: “Ummmm. I don’t know. My mom needs it. She said to get these six things.”

    Me: “You can go home and get the $2.12. I’ll hold these things here and you can come back to me and pay.”

    Child: “Ummmm… I don’t…”

    (Just then, a customer behind him speaks up.)

    Customer: “I’ll give it to him.”

    Me: “No. He does this all the time. We aren’t allowing other customers to pay anymore.”

    Customer: “It’s just $2.”

    Me: “Right, but he’s probably made $100 this month doing this same thing. We won’t allow any other customers to cover his groceries.” *turns to child* “You’ll need to go home and ask your mom what she wants you to do.”

    (About 10 minutes later, the boy returns. I figure the boy has been pocketing the money, but it turns out he hasn’t.)

    Child: “My mom said to get the money from another customer. She says they always give it to me, and why can’t I get someone to give it to me this time?”

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