November Theme Of The Month: Black Friday!

Category: Bad Behavior

The Maine Reason For Coming

| San Rafael, CA, USA | Bad Behavior, Books & Reading, Crazy Requests

(As a smaller bookstore, we do not have many books on hand and encourage people to call our store number to see if we have the book they desire. When we do have the book, we hold it behind the register for them until they come in; when we don’t happen to have the book, most people are very forgiving and understanding.)

Woman: “Hi, do you have any travel books on Maine?”

Me: “Let’s take a look!”

(I walk her over to our travel section. Unfortunately, there are no books on Maine. I try to make my disappointment obvious the customer.)

Me: “Darn. I’m really sorry, but we don’t seem to have any books on Maine!”

Woman: “Well. That’s really too bad.”

(I walk back toward the register with her.)

Me: “No, really, I am very sorry. I know how frustrating it can be to come in and see that we don’t have a book.”

Woman: “Well, I drove down here, put money in the meter, and walked in here, only to find out that you don’t have what I’m looking for.”

Me: “Ma’am, as I said, I really am truly sorry.”

(The woman proceeds to repeat how inconvenienced she’s been because she paid for a parking meter and storms off. My manager walks up to me.)

Manager: “What was that all about?”

Me: *after explaining* “Let’s just say she wasn’t thrilled about paying for parking.”

A Pain In The Nugget

, | Noblesville, IN, USA | Bad Behavior, Family & Kids, Food & Drink

(My brother works at a fast food place. The weekly supply of food is delivered Monday mornings, so by Sunday nights the store has usually run out of something. This particular week a local school had hosted a major youth baseball competition, so there’s been more business than usual and the school had neglected to inform the nearby restaurants about the event. The store is caught completely unprepared. By Sunday night they are out of chicken nuggets, one of their biggest sellers. My brother, working the front counter, has been telling customers upfront that the restaurant is out of some foods. Most of the customers have been nice about it.)

Lady: “I want a bacon cheeseburger meal, a large fry, two large drinks, and a ten piece chicken nugget meal.”

Brother: “I’m sorry, but we are currently out of large drink cups and—”

Lady: “You’re out of large cups? But that’s the size I always get!”

Brother: “I’m sorry about that, ma’am, but we do have medium cups. Will that do?”

Lady: *sighs* “Yeah, I guess.”

Brother: “We are also out of chicken nuggets. We do still have chicken patties, so if you’d like a chicken sandwich instead we could get that for you.”

Lady: “Out of chicken nuggets?! How can you be out of chicken nuggets? Don’t you know that everyone loves chicken nuggets? My kids will only eat nuggets, and I’m not leaving here until my kids have nuggets!”

Brother: “I’m sorry, but we have had more business than expected this week and have run out of nuggets. Would your kids like a hamburger instead?”

Lady: “No, they would not! They only eat chicken nuggets! I demand you sell me nuggets!”

Brother: “We are out of nuggets. Maybe they would eat a plain chicken sandwich? If they take off the bun the chicken patty would taste just like the nuggets.”

Lady: “What part of ‘they only eat nuggets’ do you not understand? Let me speak to a manager! I’ll get my nuggets and you’ll be fired for not giving them to me! Just watch!”

(My brother fetches the manager, who had just been explaining to someone at the drive-through the same thing my brother’s been explaining to this lady. He is already frustrated and does not want to deal with angry customers.)

Manager: “What seems to be the problem here?”

Lady: “This boy refuses to sell me nuggets! I want him fired for his bad service!”

Manager: “We don’t have nuggets. Order something else.”

Lady: “I cannot believe the rudeness here! That’s it; I’m leaving! You just lost a paying customer here! I hope you’re happy!”

(She stormed out. A minute later two kids about six and eight years old come in.)

Eight-Year-Old: “Mom said we had to come and get our food. Can we get some chicken nuggets, please?”

Brother: “I’m sorry, but we’re out of nuggets.”

Eight-Year-Old: “Then can we get plain hamburgers, please?”

Brother: “Of course. That’ll be $4.00.”

Eight-Year-Old: “Mom said you and the boss guy were big dummies. You don’t seem like dummies. It’s not your fault you don’t have any nuggets left.”

Brother: “Your mother also said you only eat chicken nuggets.”

Six-Year-Old: “I don’t even like nuggets. I wanted a hamburger anyway.”

(The manager let my brother give the kids each a free ice cream cone for being polite. They thanked my brother and left the restaurant smiling. Hopefully they’ll teach their mother something about manners!)

Looking For Rated S

| CA, USA | Bad Behavior, Family & Kids, Rude & Risque, Technology

(I’m working at a well-known video game chain store when two of our regulars – a man and his teenage son – walk into the store. They browse the shelves for a while before coming over to me.)

Father: *places Call of Duty game on counter* “What is this game rated ‘M’ for?”

Me: “Violence and language, if I remember correctly. Let me check to make sure.”

Father: “No sexual content?”

Me: *checking computer* “No, sir.”

Father: *to son* “Come on, dude, let’s find another game.”

A Personal Lack Of Gun Control

| WA, USA | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior

(I am a female working at a firearms retailer that also offers gunsmith services. A customer comes in and tosses a handgun onto the counter.)

Customer: “What can you quote me on a barrel extension for this?”

(I look down at the handgun and note several things.)

Me: “Well, I can certainly give you a price quote, but first, sir, if you want us to work on this, I must ask that you unload the gun.”

Customer: “What? Why?”

Me: “Well… besides the obvious safety issues in handling loaded firearms, we don’t want to risk your ammo getting lost when we have to disassemble the gun.”

Customer: “Fine.” *he ejects the magazine and puts the gun back down on the counter* “Happy?”

Me: “No, sir. I need you to check there isn’t a round in the chamber, too.”

Customer: “Look, woman, see this?” *waves the magazine at me* “Without this you’ve got nothing to worry about, okay?”

Me: “That’s… not always the case. Yes, some handgun models will not fire without the magazine but most are perfectly capable of firing so long as there’s a round in the chamber.”

Customer: “Look, is there a guy who can help me? Someone who knows how man things work?”

Me: “As you wish.”

(I call my manager and explain everything.)

Manager: “So, sir, let me see if I’ve got this straight. You don’t believe my employee, who is both licensed and has been handling firearms for the past four years she’s worked here, and are willing to endanger both our lives by handing us a loaded gun?”

Customer: “What’s the problem here? I’ve got the mag in my hands. The gun is safe!”

(My manager picks up the handgun and aims it out the window at a target range we have out back, making sure he’s not about to hit anything besides the concrete wall behind the store. He pulls the trigger and of course the gun fires as it’s supposed to, despite having no magazine.)

Manager: “May I ask you to please explain how that happened then? Since, by your own admission, you should know more about guns due to being a man?”

(The customer grabbed his now completely empty gun and stormed out of the store. The kicker? The gun was of a relatively new model that had a warning to check the chamber stamped on its side. Just goes to show why gun safety is so important!)

An Extra-Large A**-Hole

| CA, USA | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior, Crazy Requests

(The pizza shop where I work has several in-store specials, including $11.99 for a large combination. Unless a coupon or special says otherwise, it’s $2 to upgrade to an extra-large pizza. A regular customer comes in after placing an order over the phone. He is always a little curt and slightly drunk, but I’ve never had a problem with him before.)

Me: “Okay, you had an extra-large combination pizza. Anything else today?”

Customer: “No.”

Me: “That comes to $13.99.”

Customer: “They said it was $11.99.”

Me: “The special is $11.99 for a large, and $2 for an extra-large.”

Customer: “But he said $11.99 on the phone! I spoke to [New Coworker], and he said $11.99!”

Me: “It’s possible he was confused. It’s $11.99 for a large combo, and $2 to upgrade to extra-large.”

Customer: “Look, I asked him twice. I wrote it down!”

Me: “I’m sorry sir, but it’s always $2 more for an extra-large. It’s on the poster in the window. If [New Coworker] said $11.99 for an extra-large, he was mistaken.”

Customer: “I wrote it down!”

Me: “I’m sorry, but—”

Customer: “Do you want me to leave the pizza here? I’m walking away.”

(I turn to my manager, who’s working nearby.)

Me: “Uh, what should I…?”

Manager: *quietly* “Just give it to him. It’s okay.”

Me: *to the customer* “Okay sir, $11.99. Sorry about the confusion.”

(The customer says nothing and hands me his credit card. The machine processes and asks to print a receipt.)

Me: “Thank you, sir. Would you like your receipt today?”

Customer: *annoyed* “No.”

(I finish the transaction and close the register.)

Me: “Okay, have a good day, sir!”

Customer: “Can I get a receipt?”

Me: “…”