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    Angels In America

    | GA, USA | Awesome Customers, Family & Kids, Top

    (I’m stocking a shelf. I notice a customer with her five-year-old daughter. They both look like they’ve been through a hard time.)

    Little Girl: “Mama, I’m hungry.”

    (The mother looks near tears.)

    Mother: “I know baby; I’m sorry. Mommy only has $5, so we have to find food that will stretch until next week when mommy gets paid.”

    Little Girl: “Okay.”

    (I see a another customer with a baby in a cart walk up to the woman.)

    Another Customer: “Excuse me, I couldn’t help but overhear you. I don’t mean to put you on the spot, but I’d like to help you.”

    (The other customer holds out a $20 bill. The mother starts to cry.)

    Mother: “You don’t even know me, and you’re trying to help me. My husband walked out. I work a minimum wage job, and it’s just been so hard. You’re the first person who has shown me such kindness in a long time, and you’re a stranger to me.”

    Another Customer: “I’m someone who thinks the world would work a bit better if people paid it forward a little more. I might not know you, but I know you’ve been dealt a bad hand. When’s the last time you ate? I’m sure you’re making sure your daughter eats, but when’s the last time you did?”

    Mother: “How did you—”

    Another Customer “Because you’re a mother.”

    Mother: “I… thank you so much! This will really help. Are you sure?”

    Another Customer: “I’m positive. You know you can get some of the stuff here ‘2 for 1’, so that can help.”

    Mother: “Thank you… thank you so much! I’ll find a way to pay you back.”

    Another Customer: “There’s no need to do that. I hope things get better for you, and when they do, you can pay it forward.”

    Mother: “Thank you so much.”

    (I’m called to the front, so I don’t see the rest of the exchange. The mother and daughter come through my lane with a cart full of food.)

    Little Girl: “Mommy, was that lady an angel?”

    Mother: “Yes baby, she was.”

    (Their total comes to just under the 25 dollars the mother had. I relate the story to my manager. When the other customer comes up with her daughter, my manager has a gift card for $20 waiting for her. That customer comes in every month or so, and we all refer to her as the angel.)